Face Time

 03 Aug 2014

Inspired by melaleuca bark, perhaps the most arresting thing about 1 Scott Street Apartments at Kangaroo Point, Brisbane, is its incredible, sculptural concrete façade. And it’s not just a thing of elegance and beauty, the concrete form that clads the eastern elevation of the new 15-storey building on the banks of the Brisbane River provides both thermal protection and visual privacy for the luxury apartments (as seen from the Bradfield Highway as the main arterial approaches the Story Bridge).

Scott Street Apartments on the Brisbane River is a new 10-apartment tower – with one apartment per floor – offering a luxurious interior and a striking, sculptural public face to the outside world.
 
The melaleuca-inspired screen was developed as 16 pre-cast concrete panels, explains Paul Brace, Director of Interiors at Jackson Teece architects and the person responsible for designing the equally impressive insides of the building.

As Brace explains, the building has been conceived as a luxury residential block and the brief by its developers, Waterford Properties, was a structure – replacing a 1950s hotel formerly on the site – with “a lot of personality”.

“The compact spatial requirements of the under-bench unit, the health benefits of filtered chilled and boiling water, the very reasonable pricing and convenience were all key factors in specifying Zip.”

The building is made up of 10 apartments, including a “three-storey apartment on the ground floor,” says Brace, who is based in the Sydney office, “then one apartment per floor and then a two-storey penthouse [on top]”.

The main apartments, taking up a floor each, are identical in layout and finishes. Each home offers four bedrooms and five bathrooms over an area of around 450 square metres.

On a floor plan of a typical apartment you notice the outer walls of the building to the north and the south display a gentle curve on each side towards the middle – concave – as if the whole building has been delicately squeezed together.

This allows the bedrooms, which are at the eastern end of the plan “to have city views,” says Brace, “because they are angled towards the view rather than just looking north or south.”

On the western side of the building is a huge living space, which opens to a deep terrace overlooking the Brisbane River and the CBD. The terrace is necessarily deep to keep out the western sun at its most harsh. “Sun penetrates very late in the day and there’s a drop down shade blind [on the outside of the terrace] that can be used for the half hour that the sun is troublesome,” says Brace.

The living room itself is flexible with sliding glass walls that enable areas to be opened up or closed down to provide intimate space. There’s also a sliding glass panel that allows the kitchen, which is at the rear of the living space, to be hidden from view. The kitchen is large and sleek and boasts a walk-in pantry plus all the appliances you would expect a contemporary prestige residence to have – including boiling and chilled filtered water available on command.

“We found the Zip HydroTap an elegant solution,” says Jonathan Kavali Development Manager, Waterford Properties in explaining the specification of the innovative product. “The compact spatial requirements of the under-bench unit, the health benefits of filtered chilled and boiling water, the very reasonable pricing and convenience were all key factors in specifying Zip.”

Floors throughout the building are a balance of limestone, timber (in the living room) and plush pile carpeted bedrooms. The palette is “very calm, very neutral with not too many materials going on”, says Brace. Contemporary or more traditional furniture and furnishings are equally at home in the apartments, he says. “It’s all going to work, that’s the idea of it.”

"Article taken from Boiling Point issue no.17, published by the Indesign Media Asia Pacific. Words by Guy Allenby. Photography by Scott Burrows. Architect by Jackson Teece"